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  1. Gosh Alison, I don't blame you at all! Sounds a bit nightmarish! Here in Albuquerque, the "trash men" come once a week, but use a truck to lift and dump out your trash can. They won't get out of their trucks to pick up anything that has fallen out, and they won't take away the trash if you have more than what fits in the bin. I think that's ridiculous. Anyway, I too would be upset if I had to deal with your trash matters! I can't imagine having it sit there for two weeks!

  2. Oh its just awful that you feel this way. I know you are not alone either. Recycling is very important but Local Authorities are just not helping are they! I love your recycling bags though. I have a jute affair that always seems to be brimming over.
    All I can suggest is chin up, and have a rant at your local council.

  3. Some little suggestions to make it all a little nicer..
    Go out and buy three small but pretty little bins – one for recycling, one for all the stuff they won't recycle and one for the compose heap!
    If you faithfully wash out everything you put in the recycling, I promise it won't smell.
    Start a compost heap – you can get special kits and it will keep all your potted plants happy.
    Get yourself one of those wheelie bin rose stickers to cover the monster – http://www.wheelie-bin-art.co.uk/wheelie_bin_cove

  4. I agree Alison, what's the world coming to?
    and the council expects us to wash all the cans and plastic for them, but only pick up our stinky trash every two weeks,
    there is defiently something wrong with that I would say!!!!!!

  5. Why not provide people with small bins and empty said small bin once a week? This wreaks of the council trying to save money rather than the council meeting green targets. Did you know that in Peterborough they have bar codes on your bins and if they are only half full you get a rebate on your council tax…at least that's what's said in "Save Cash, Save the Planet".
    Oh, and whilst I'm on this subject, recycling is just a very minor drop in the ocean in the sea of environmental responsibility (sorry for the torturous analogy). The government should be encouraging us to simply reduce what we buy…or buy second hand, but perhaps that would get on too many big-wigs nerves.

  6. You certainly have reason to throw a hissy fit! Every two weeks? Crazy.
    Here's an idea I learned from my grandmother. Of course, it was just she and Granddaddy, then, her alone, so this was very easy for her. She put in a plastic bag her food garbage, and put that in the freezer until trash day. When I asked why she did this, she said it was because the trash cans got so smelly waiting for the pick up. This is a good idea ~ you just have to remember to get the garbage out of the freezer on trash day, too!

  7. You certainly have reason to throw a hissy fit! Every two weeks? Crazy.
    Here’s an idea I learned from my grandmother. Of course, it was just she and Granddaddy, then, her alone, so this was very easy for her. She put in a plastic bag her food garbage, and put that in the freezer until trash day. When I asked why she did this, she said it was because the trash cans got so smelly waiting for the pick up. This is a good idea ~ you just have to remember to get the garbage out of the freezer on trash day, too!

  8. Here in Toronto we have separate receptacles for garbage, recycling and compostable materials. Compost stuff gets picked up weekly (thankfully) and recycling and garbage are picked up every other week (they rotate).
    Here's our dilemma: we use plastic grocery bags as liners in our little compost bucket in the kitchen. But, as we are trying to move towards a grocery-bag-free lifestyle (using reusable bags instead) we are running out of our stash of plastic bags. I guess the only way forward is to give the little bucket a good wash-out daily … yuck.

  9. Here in Toronto we have separate receptacles for garbage, recycling and compostable materials. Compost stuff gets picked up weekly (thankfully) and recycling and garbage are picked up every other week (they rotate).
    Here’s our dilemma: we use plastic grocery bags as liners in our little compost bucket in the kitchen. But, as we are trying to move towards a grocery-bag-free lifestyle (using reusable bags instead) we are running out of our stash of plastic bags. I guess the only way forward is to give the little bucket a good wash-out daily … yuck.

  10. Here in Bristol we have the fortnightly wheelie bin collection (actually I'd quite like the purple Liverpool ones), but recycling and kitchen waste is collected weekly from our black boxes and brown bins. You could try nagging your council into doing the same and providing a weekly food waste collection. It works well for us – the main problem is figuring out where to store all these bins and boxes. If your council refuses to play along your other options include making sure you eat every single scrap of food that enters your house so there's no waste… starting up a compost heap and a wormery for cooked food (not necessarily practical in a small garden, but Wiggly Wigglers now do a "bokashi-empowered" kitchen composting range that promises to be whiff-free), or scraping food waste into compostable bio-bags before putting them into your bin to keep it more hygienic – I use these to line my food waste bin as it makes the job of emptying it so much less vile. I'm a bit of a compost/recycling queen mind you, I hate to see stuff going into landfill. Hope this helps.

  11. There is nowhere more 'recycle mad' than Japan. We have no less than 9 catorgeries to sort household rubbish in to. Certain days, certain catorgories are picked up. Each street has a collection area and if you dare to put out the wrong type or get the days mixed up, self appointed rubbish inspectors (angry little old ladies) who live on the same street, bring it back to you. They sort through and find out who, exactly, it belongs to. Large items, plastic larger than 30cm, electrical items, furniture etc., have to be paid for removal by appointment with the local corporation. Also, you have to wash and clean everything thoroughly, tie newspapers and fold cloth. I am English and soon to be returning home. I am sure I will find it strange to just pile rubbish in a bin!

  12. Local Authorities have recycling targets imposed on them by central government – if they don't meet them then there are financial penalties (meaning higher council tax bills or cuts in service to compensate). We're running out of landfill – something needs to be done. Also, if it helps cope with the stinky bin thing – think of the better future you're leaving for your little 'un and try not to put as much stuff in there.

  13. It seems to me the best way to keep from having so much to throw away would be for them to make the companys use minimal packaging.

  14. I live in Lancashire on a farm, and the council told me that they can't take our recycling due to "lack of resources." Rubbish collection is once a week, and though we were issued a wheeley bin, we have been told to put things in bags, in the wheeley bin, or the rubbish guy can't take it. He only has a small truck and can't lift the bin. Sooo…..we put our recycling in two plastic containers that are in the shed, we put out our rubbish in the plastic bags the council issued us, and then we use our wheeley bins for composting for our garden, putting food waste and grass clipping in there. When the recycling bins are full, we drive them down to the local centre (about 5 minutes by car).
    I think there has to be an easier way.

  15. This sort of collection started here fairly recently. The sanitation department has somewhat smaller bins available by request.
    One of my complaints is that it makes reduces my trash picking finds dramatically!

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