The House of Belonging-Question Two-Childhood Memories..

By alison August 16, 2007 19 Comments 2 Min Read

Ideallvillag_3

When we remember our
childhood, we remember, not events, or whole days, but fleeting, tiny
moments that flicker through our senses like moments from our
dreams…

We remember the scent
of our mother leaning over us as she kissed us. We remember the
leather of our parent’s sofa sticking to our bare legs and the
scratchy blanket we rubbed between our fingers as we fell asleep. We
remember the heady smells of the roast dinner emanating from our
Nanas kitchen and the pattern on the wall paper of our childhood
bedroom. We remember all of this and somewhere deep inside us, these
memories form the markers of what it means to be home…

These memories, these
little moments from our dreams become sacred because they are what we
know. They are the teeny ordinary things we had the time to notice
as children: a time when our senses are most alive, eager for the
detail inherent in everything that surround us, a time when it was
all the ordinary things that mattered. The sacred ordinary…

I tell you all this
because I want you to ask yourself if there is a house from your
childhood that you go back to, and tonight I want you to remember
what it was at that house that made it feel like home…

Was it the scent of
lavender brushing against your legs as you walked up the path? The
profusion of snuggly blankets on your Mothers couch? A colour, or
fragrance that instantly takes you back?

Try to remember one
thing: a scent, or a texture (nubbly chenille bedspread anyone?) that
makes you smile and make a note to incorporate it in your home one
way or another, so that even for the tiniest of moments, there is a
place in your house that makes you feel truly, authentically home…

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19 Comments

  1. Amy says:

    oh yes I can do that! THe first house we lived in was a 2 storey one on a quiet street we moved when I was 9 years old but I DO miss it 🙂

  2. Amy says:

    oh yes I can do that! THe first house we lived in was a 2 storey one on a quiet street we moved when I was 9 years old but I DO miss it 🙂

  3. Cherry says:

    I just can't stay quiet for any longer (I have 'lurked' in the background for quite sometime but never been brave enough to write). This piece you have just written was fantastic! It sums up exactly how I feel about my home and bringing up my daughter. Giving her memories to last a lifetime, of home, family and the simple pleasures of life. Keep up the great work Alison.

  4. Amy says:

    Alison,
    I don't have to IMAGINE the home I grew up in. I am living in it. I inherited my childhood home. The little cozy red ranch home is where my children are making their memories. Same bedroom,Fairy houses being built under the tall, tall pines in the yard, same bus stop at the end of the driveway, same schools. I wrote about it with photos in my category "Curious Corners Outside My Home". Please come visit!! I will have the raspberry spiked lemonade and tea sandwiches ready for your arrival!
    Amy at Abundant Curiosities

    1. chrissie says:

      green with envy Amy ! Hugs C

  5. Stefani says:

    Really, truly beautiful and inspiring post. Thank you!

  6. Jayne says:

    I'll second what Cherry and Stefani have said – this was beautifully written and as is always the case with your site, you've come up with inspiration to help make a house a home.
    I lived by the beach as a child and that's what I miss the most. Without consciously thinking about it, I realised after reading your piece that I've surrounded myself with little pieces artwork depicting the sea and small bowls of precious shells, collected with the children on various trips to the beach. I've also currently been eyeing up a book about coastal homes in the US!
    I'm so glad you didn't stay away Alison – visits to your site are always a pleasure.

  7. Sue says:

    Oh yes, my grandparents’ farmhouse in Northamptonshire. Thick stone walls, small windows and so generally quite dark rooms, but the sun would shine through the open doorway and cast shadows on one particular wall. The farmhouse stayed in the family until the late 1990s, but the memories that come to life for me the most are those from the 1950s and 60s.
    When we moved to our second home in Bath 15 years ago, part of which was the remains of a 17th century dairy, the sun shone through a window and cast the very same (or so it seemed) shadows onto a curved wall. This was the room I chose to use as my office. We lived there for only 4 years but there was always something very special about that room – and the whole house.
    Sue

  8. Sue says:

    Oh yes, my grandparents’ farmhouse in Northamptonshire. Thick stone walls, small windows and so generally quite dark rooms, but the sun would shine through the open doorway and cast shadows on one particular wall. The farmhouse stayed in the family until the late 1990s, but the memories that come to life for me the most are those from the 1950s and 60s.
    When we moved to our second home in Bath 15 years ago, part of which was the remains of a 17th century dairy, the sun shone through a window and cast the very same (or so it seemed) shadows onto a curved wall. This was the room I chose to use as my office. We lived there for only 4 years but there was always something very special about that room – and the whole house.
    Sue

  9. Sue says:

    Oh yes, my grandparents' farmhouse in Northamptonshire. Thick stone walls, small windows and so generally quite dark rooms, but the sun would shine through the open doorway and cast shadows on one particular wall. The farmhouse stayed in the family until the late 1990s, but the memories that come to life for me the most are those from the 1950s and 60s.
    When we moved to our second home in Bath 15 years ago, part of which was the remains of a 17th century dairy, the sun shone through a window and cast the very same (or so it seemed) shadows onto a curved wall. This was the room I chose to use as my office. We lived there for only 4 years but there was always something very special about that room – and the whole house.
    Sue

  10. I've actually posted quite a lot lately about my parents house. Pink and white victorian and they have a new "playhouse" trailer out back now. Their house is the house I go back to in my mind. Ironically, my farm house is nearly identical to my parents first house. Blessings… Polly

  11. Lori says:

    I am so far away from the family I grew up around but I do have my own darlings and incorporating the past into our present, it's what i find myself doing all the time and it's wonderful.

  12. Rachael says:

    Hi Alison
    Thanks for the Vintage Housekeepers Morning Routine, I use it daily much to my husbands amusement. He likes to see what I write for Puttery Treats!
    Have a good day
    Take Care
    Rachaelx

  13. Helena says:

    I have been a visitor for a while but a little new in the commenting department. I truly enjoy my visits to your inspiring blog.
    I also live far away from my parents but the thing I remember most about my childhood home was having crosses and rosaries hanging on the walls. My mom is very religious as am I, and having these on the wall always reminds me of her and the beliefs I grew up with but most of all I enjoy the feelings of comfort they bring.

  14. Helena says:

    I have been a visitor for a while but a little new in the commenting department. I truly enjoy my visits to your inspiring blog.
    I also live far away from my parents but the thing I remember most about my childhood home was having crosses and rosaries hanging on the walls. My mom is very religious as am I, and having these on the wall always reminds me of her and the beliefs I grew up with but most of all I enjoy the feelings of comfort they bring.

  15. Carol M says:

    For me it is my grandparent's house, especially the kitchen. I was fortunate enough to be given a tour of the house by the new owners a few years back. I was a bit sad to see how all the renovations took away the charm of the place, (especially since my grandfather built the home) , the built-ins and old woodwork were gone. But it was now their home. They were wonderful and actually gave me my grandparents' pedestal bathroom sink and art deco dining room chandelier that were stored in the basement since renovations. Before my grandmother sold the house, we videotaped every room with all the furniture, knick-knacks, pictures, etc., where they had always been — something I do now with every house I've lived in. Both grandparents are gone, so when I'm missing them, I pop in the tape and have a good cry!

  16. Grace says:

    We lived in a different house nearly every single year of my childhood and my family was quite dysfunctional and very poor so I don't have a lot of fond memories of being at home except for my grandmother's home – the smell of cornbread and beans, pumpkin cookies and all of the treasures to look at. Best treasure of all – Grandma.

  17. Jenna says:

    I am going to have to sit back and close my eyes on this one for a bit. But I wanted to let you know what a lovely, amazing post this was. Thank you for provoking warm thoughts and giving us all a perfectly splendid idea for creating a welcome hug of a memory-inducing home enhancement! Thank you! (I found your blog via the Happy Zombie and am adding you to my bloglines post haste!)

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